Search

Search Keywords

 
 
 

Images/Products Matching

Sort By:  
Salmon Fishing in July Ludington
Salmon Fishing in July Ludington
Salmon Fishing in July Ludington
$0.00
Fired Up
I have witnessed several thousand sunsets on the Ludington waterfront, but I never tire of looking for that next spectacular one, especially for the ones that are dramatically different from all the others. On this April evening, a front was approaching from the northwest just as the sun was setting. The bottom of the clouds looked like fiery flames as they swept toward shore. I am glad I was there to witness and make art of this sunset.
$0.00
Frozen
Frozen
This scene would look very flat and two-dimensional most days. Except for a few fleeting moments today, the light and shadows cooperated and turned the Ludington shoreline into a beautiful arrangement of lines, shapes, textures, and colors that appears to be much more three-dimensional.
$0.00
Rachel\'s Day 19 of 366 - January 19, 2020
Rachel Gaudette’s Day 19 of 366 - January 19, 2020
The waves were wild while making photographs of the Ludington North Breakwater Light at Stearns Beach. Nikon D810. F6.3 at 1/1000, ISO 3200. 60-600mm lens at 600mm. On a tripod without a flash. January 19, 2020 at 11:16am.
$0.00
Shadows to the Light
Shadows to the Light
Shadows to the Light
$0.00
Stearns Beach Days
Stearns Beach Days
Stearns Beach Days
$0.00
Rainbow Over Ludington Lighthouse (3881)
Rainbow Over Ludington Lighthouse (3881)
Rainbow Over Ludington Lighthouse
$0.00
Invitation to Winter
Invitation to Winter
Winter arrived in Ludington today while we were gone. This is my view of the Lake Michigan shoreline at Stearns Park upon my return. After donning a lot of foul weather gear, I venture into the blizzard-like conditions to make this shot. This weather is beyond exhilarating.
$0.00
God Beam
Heaven knows how many times a God beam has lit the Ludington lighthouse. But when I saw this beauty shining down, I felt its spiritual quality more strongly than any other God beam I have seen before or since. On this calm May day of 1993, I was already underway in my tiny Boston Whaler skiff searching for photo opportunities because of the dramatic clouds. I quickly maneuvered closer to the lighthouse and centered the iconic Ludington landmark beneath the glorious beam. I laid over the low gunwale and fired away for about 20 breathtaking seconds before the clouds and spotlight moved away. As a longtime Lake Michigan mariner, there have been many times during the calmest or stormiest voyages that I have felt God’s presence; this was one of those times. As a longtime photographer, I have learned to better know when I am being presented with an extraordinary view with or without looking through the viewfinder; this was one of those views. The image I was blessed to make that day more than a quarter century ago remains my favorite calm day photograph with the Ludington lighthouse in the scene. In 2007, “God Beam” was selected for the cover of an inspirational book titled Hope: pure and simple. The book features “316 thoughts to lift your soul” by famous Christian author Max Lucado. I was humbled to have an image that means a great deal to me personally grace the cover of Pastor Lucado’s hopeful book.
$0.00
Ripples and Rows
Ripples and Rows
A momentary lull in the wind stops the nearby snow from blowing long enough for me to make an image of the intriguing patterns of the sand, snow, fences, and waves along the Lake Michigan shoreline today.
$0.00
Stearns Beach Days - Panoramic
Stearns Beach Days - Panoramic
Stearns Beach Days - Panoramic
$0.00
Ludington Trails - Panoramic
Ludington Trails - Panoramic
Little things can make or break an image. Straight horizontal lines in a photograph can be extremely destructive to the flow of a composition. This photograph would not work if it were not for the three diagonal lines in the sky. The diagonal lines get the viewer's eyes moving around the photograph and lead one's attention to the lighthouse. D7000, F22 at 1/30, 100 ISO, 70-200mm lens at 185mm
$0.00
White Squall
I have photographed dozens of storms with waves as big as or bigger than those I shot during this February 1995 storm, but this image remains one of my favorite storm images because of the wave’s shape, position in relationship to the Ludington lighthouse, position of the seagulls and drama created by the storm light. I consider this image “perfectly poetic.” As my Grandma Reed liked to say about her small but precisely designed and tastefully decorated home: “There is a place for everything, and everything in its place.” I made dozens of exposures on Fuji Velvia film this day, none so perfectly poetic as this one. My youngest son, Willie, and I watched this February storm for hours, capturing photographic moments during lulls in the blizzard. As sunset neared, I prayed for storm light. If this magic light arrived, it would appear shortly before sunset, and only if the sun could find its way through, or beneath, a band of boiling clouds skirting the distant horizon. It is a photographer’s game of hide-and-seek I have played with the sun and clouds thousands of times. I love winning, but experience has taught me that I am more likely to lose or at least not win big. This time, as I had envisioned, sunlight broke from beneath the clouds, backlighting the waves and the lighthouse. Rewarded by the knowledge of what could happen and by perseverance, Willie and I were oblivious to the gale winds pummeling us as we witnessed the magic light and lake’s fury come together against the storm cloud backdrop.
$0.00
God's Light

This is, as I look back at my first 50 years as a photographer, the best photograph I have ever made. That lightning bolt still explodes in my mind’s eye nearly a quarter-century after it lit up the night on September 19, 1997. At least once more in my lifetime I would like the privilege of photographing a moment as power-packed as this one. I was as charged as the air about me as an enormous storm cloud fired lightning bolts faster than a giant Gatling gun and swept across Lake Michigan toward my vantage point on the Ludington shoreline. I had a crow’s nest view looking west toward Lake Michigan from my Officer of the Day berthing room on the second deck of Coast Guard Station Ludington.

An hour earlier, I had been readying to get my boat crew underway for nighttime training aboard Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat 44345 when I spotted what at first glance looked like miniature lightning bolts barely visible dancing across the entire western horizon. We were seeing a thunderstorm hitting Wisconsin and heading our way. We secured the boat for heavy weather with extra lines and secured the station. With our work day done, I retreated to my room and set up my 300-millimeter lens on my tripod, awaiting the advancing tempest. I maintained my visualized composition, never changing the narrow aim of the Nikon N90 camera at the Ludington lighthouse. I had never seen so many lightning bolts in the sky at once. I decided that the odds of capturing one large bolt lighting up the Ludington lighthouse could not be better than now.

As the stormfront raced across Lake Michigan at 45 knots, I began taking 30-second time exposures when it was still 30 miles away. The closer the storm came to the Ludington shoreline, the louder, larger and brighter the lightning became. Many bolts were going off during every time exposure shot, but often north or south of the narrow angle of view of my large telephoto lens. I began doubting my decision not to use a wider angle. The super cell of the thunderstorm was less than a half-mile away now. The lightning was revealing a massive thunderhead cloud steamrolling end-over-end right at me. Boom! I jumped for the first time from the concussion. The light was blinding. My camera was recording it. But what did the camera see? And even if there was a big bolt recorded on the Fuji Velvia slide film, was it going to be in a good position relative to the lighthouse? Only time would tell—a lot of time. There was no instant feedback with film. I would have to wait until I was off duty to send the film in and then wait several days more for it to come back. 

I remember like it was yesterday pulling slide after slide out of the plastic storage box they came back in from the processor and looking at them one by one on my light table with an eight-power loupe. The first slides I reviewed, which were the first shots taken when the storm was further away, quickly turned my excitement into disappointment. The images were not living up to the experience. But the further I dug into the box, the bigger the bolts were, and the more they lit up and colored the sky. Finally, upon pulling out the next to last slide in the box, I saw the image I had visualized making, except far better than I could have ever imagined making of my own accord. I believe God was my guide in capturing this Heaven-sent moment. I named the image “God’s Light.”

Post note: Without my knowledge, my wife, Debbie, entered the original “God’s Light” 35-millimeter slide in the 1998 Nikon International Contest. It won third place.

 

$0.00
Roil Blue
Roil Blue
Seas roiling like a cauldron of churning, boiling water are bathed in storm light during one of the most spectacular Lake Michigan gales of November I have ever seen. Gulls soar above the Ludington lighthouse, on the lookout for fish churned with the waves.
$0.00
DSCF8268
DSCF8268
DSCF8268
$0.00
Home Base
Home Base
The base of the Ludington North Breakwater Lighthouse juts seaward like the bow of a ship as the carferry Badger returns to Ludington harbor on a late summer evening.
$0.00
Peaceful Evening
Peaceful Evening
Peaceful Evening
$0.00
Michigan Lightning
Michigan Lightning
I was in awe of the giant bolts of lightning striking Lake Michigan as I stood on the beach at the end of Ludington Avenue during a fierce September electrical storm. One massive bolt after another came crashing down and I was lucky enough to capture one that split on both sides of the lighthouse. When I downloaded the photo the next day, my dad quickly noticed that the bolt looked like the lower peninsula of Michigan.
$0.00
Mystic Morning
Mystic Morning
The Ludington lighthouse draws my eye whenever I am near it. So many times, it offers a spectacular picture but, too often, not quite splendid enough to trip the shutter. One foggy summer morning there was no doubt I should shoot.
$0.00
Per Page      61 - 80 of 355